Art Fix Daily Asian Highlights Article

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Thanks to Art Fix Daily for mentioning our upcoming Asian, Ancient, and Ethnographic auctions that go live tomorrow October 4th and October 6th. There will be over 750 lots of Asian works of art available, including an exceptional sale of fine netsuke, Ming Huang Huali furniture, and a curated selection of Ming and Qing porcelain, jades, and ancient bronzes.

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http://www.igavelauctions.com/auctions/lark-mason-associates-fall-asian-works-art-auction/

http://www.igavelauctions.com/auctions/fine-netsuke-auction/

http://www.igavelauctions.com/auctions/igavel-asian-ancient-ethnographic-works-art-auction/
http://www.artfixdaily.com/artwire/release/6678-lark-mason-associates-fall-sale-of-asian-ancient-and-ethnographic

Lark Mason Appraisal Most Valuable in ARS History – Mashable

CapturFiles_2Popular news website, technology and social media blog Mashable recently published the top 10 most valued items in Antiques Roadshow’s history. Top of that list was Lark Mason’s appraisal of 18th century Chinese rhinoceros horn cups, estimated at  $1 million to $1.5 million at auction. The episode originally aired in January 2012. Click here to view it now.

Other notable finds include an 18th century Qianlong jade collection from the Qing Dynasty, estimated at $710,000 to $1.07 million at auction, and a 1904 Diego Rivera’s “El Albañil” oil painting, worth $800,000 to $1 million in retail value.

Read the full story here

‘Antiques Roadshow’ is Back in NYC After 13 Years

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The most valuable items ever appraised on Antiques Roadshow: Asian arts expert Lark Mason identified this collection of five late 17th/early 18th-century Chinese carved rhinoceros horn cups and valued the set at $1 million to $1.5 million. (Antiques Roadshow)

You’re coming back to New York after 13 years? 
Yeah, the last time we were there as in 2001. You’ve got it right. We were in Rochester before that but this is our second time in the city, third time in the state.

I was wondering if you noticed any changes in the kinds of ways people sort of approached going to Roadshow. For example, has the Internet helped or hindered or made people that they are more expert?

I think overall I would say that the Internet has been a great help. It has made us a more informed public, which is ultimately the goal of Antiques Roadshow. And so you can definitely see a more knowledgeable public overall at the events from when we first started doing the show. Back when we started taping, nobody had a cellphone, really—forget the Internet, what was that word that has a capital “I.”

We just didn’t have the kind of information we have at our fingertips. And what some of the Roadshow experts tell me—and they’re the ones in the market, and I think it’s really interesting—when Roadshow first started airing Disney cels, you know animation cels, people thought they were more rare than when Roadshow first started airing them, this is pre-Internet. All of a sudden people with Disney cels came out of the woodwork. It brought prices down because they weren’t as rare as people thought.

So it’s made us a more powerful public, a more knowledgeable public about what does exist because we can actually connect with one another, whereas we couldn’t before. That makes us a more knowledgeable person.

Read the rest of the story on Gothamist

‘Antiques Roadshow’ attracts nearly 5,000 from Chicago area

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Image Credit Chicago Tribune

More than 18,000 people entered the lottery to win tickets and about 5,000 people had up to two objects appraised by one of 72 appraisers during a taping of “Antiques Roadshow” at McCormick Place. One of PBS’ most popular programs features short segments in which an average Joe describes what he has brought and why, and an expert appraiser discusses the item’s likely history and cultural relevance and gives as estimated value.

 

Read the full story on Chicago Tribune

What you need to know before ‘Antiques Roadshow’ pulls into Chicago Saturday

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Lark Mason valued this collection of five Chinese carved rhinoceros horn cups at $1 million to $1.5 million. (Photo courtesy PBS)

 

PBS’ popular appraisal series, “Antiques Roadshow,” is dropping by Chicago’s McCormick Place Saturday as part of an eight-city summer tour.

 

Nearly 19,000 people applied for the 3,000 pairs of tickets that will get attendees — and their two precious items — into the event. (Don’t bother showing up if you don’t have a ticket.

 

A team of 70 experts from around the world will verbally appraise roughly 10,000 objects over the course of the day. A small fraction of these appraisals will be highlighted in a trio of upcoming “Antiques Roadshow” episodes airing in the 19th season, which launches in January on WTTW-Channel 11.

 

Read the rest of the story on Chicago Sun-Times

Chinese Collectors Discuss Recent Auction of Imperial Scroll on Sina Weibo

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Chinese art collectors and specialists converged on Chinese social media sites to discuss the recent sale of an imperial hand scroll on iGavel Auctions. The scroll was notable for its depiction of Chinese generals involved in the subduing of Taiwan during the Qing Dynasty. Various people across the world took to sites such as Sina Weibo to offer commentary and insight on the scroll.

Click here to view the discussion

Limits on Ivory Sales, Meant to Protect Elephants, Set Off Wide Concerns

Published on NYTimes.com

New federal rules aimed at blocking the sale of ivory to protect endangered elephants are causing an uproar among musicians, antiques dealers, gun collectors and thousands of others whose ability to sell, repair or travel with legally acquired ivory objects will soon be prohibited.

Vince Gill, the guitarist and Grammy Award winner, who owns some 40 classic Martin guitars featuring ivory pegs and bridges, said he is worried now about taking his instruments overseas.

Floyd Sarisohn, a lawyer from Commack, N.Y., said he will be blocked from auctioning any of the hundreds of chess sets with antique ivory pieces he has spent decades collecting.

Mike Clark, owner of Collectors Firearms in Houston, said he fears he might have to “gouge the ivory inlay” from scores of commemorative handguns and rifles that long predate the ban, if he wants to sell them.

“I’m blindsided, as are all of us, by this regulatory change,” said Lark Mason, a New York auctioneer who has specialized in antique ivory for three decades. “We all want to save elephants,” he said, but he questioned how “denying the sale of an 18th-century snuff bottle,” among millions of other decorative antiques, will accomplish that end.

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A new law could keep Bernice Sarisohn and her husband, Floyd, from auctioning any of their antique ivory chess pieces. Credit Bryan Thomas for The New York Times

In simple terms, the new regulations ban Americans from importing and, with narrow exceptions, exporting any item that contains even a sliver of ivory. The rules do not ban private ownership, but they outlaw interstate sales of ivory items, unless they meet what sellers describe as impossible criteria.

Continue reading the story on NYTimes.com

Asia Week New York | Lark Mason Associates Preview and Events

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iGavel Auctions/Lark Mason Associates is honored to be a proud sponsor of Asia Week New York 2014. During Asia Week, many other auction houses, museums and art societies hold specialized events and lectures for interested parties. Click here to learn more about the events that will be taking place during Asia Week.

Auction of Asian Art

This year’s online Auction of Asian Art will be live between April 15th through 30th on iGavelAuctions.com. Below are some highlights that will be offered during the auction:

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Large Chinese Gilt Bronze Seated Figure. Ming Dynasty

 

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Chinese Porcelain Peachbloom Water Pot. Kangxi Period

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Chinese Imperial Zitan and Jichimu Throne-back Armchair.
Qianlong Period. Zitan and Jichimu Wood

 

Click here to visit the Asia Week New York website

Asia Week Preview

March 15th – March 21st
10am-4pm (closed Sunday)

Online auction begins April 15th on iGavelAuctions.com

Lark Mason Associates Auction Gallery
227 East 120th Street
New York, NY 10035
(between 2nd & 3rd Avenues)
212-289-5524

Get Directions

Amanda Everard Discusses Collecting Cameras on WebTalkRadio

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Amanda Everard, the President of Everard & Company

iGavel associate seller Amanda Everard of Everard & Company was guests of Web Talk Radio’s latest The Collectors Show episode with Harold Nicoll. The two talk about collecting old cameras and equipment in the age of digital photography and smartphones.

Click here to listen to the interview on WebTalkRadio website.

For more information on Everard & Company, visit their website at www.Everard.com

Asia Week New York | iGavel Preview and Events

iGavel Auctions is honored to be a proud sponsor of Asia Week New York 2014. During Asia Week, many other auction houses, museums and art societies hold specialized events and lectures for interested parties. Click here to learn more about the events that will be taking place during Asia Week.

Asian, Ancient and Ethnographic Works of Art

This year’s Asian, Ancient and Ethnographic Works of Art online auction will be live between April 15th through 30th on iGavelAuctions.com.  Below are some highlights that  will be offered during the auction:

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 Large Chinese Gilt Bronze Seated Figure. China, Ming Dynasty

 

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Chinese Porcelain Peachbloom Water Pot. China, Kangxi Period

 

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Chinese Imperial Zitan and Jichimu Throne-back Armchair.
China, Qianlong Period. Zitan and Jichimu Wood

These items will be available for viewing during Asia Week, March 15–21, as well as between April 21–25 during our exhibition.

For more information on Asia Week New York, click here to visit their website

We will be hosting an Asia Week preview in our gallery on March 15th through March 21st, 10am-4pm (Closed Sunday). Please refer to the address below for our location and directions:

iGavel Auctions Gallery
229 East 120th Street
New York, NY 10035
(between 2nd & 3rd Avenues)
212.289.5588

Get Directions

iGavel and Lark Mason Featured on Examiner.com

Popular online news website Examiner.com’s Jennifer Eberhart talks about Lark Mason and the success of iGavel Auctions in her column. Below is an excerpt from the article:

Mainly comprised of regional dealers like Nye and Company, Daniel Cooney Fine Art, and Litchfield County Auctions, iGavel has a never-ending supply of artworks passing through its site. Over fifteen categories are noted on the site, including stamps, jewelry, books, and fine art. Mason notes that the top sales are in furniture, painting, and Asian art. Sales have exceeded the $2 million mark in the past but you can find smaller works online for a starting bid as low as $25.

 

Lark Mason, an expert in Asian art whose past experience includes work at Sotheby’s, and who is now a television personality on Antiques Roadshow, says he loves “the dynamism of the art market” – working an antiques business means he can combine both research and finance in his career.

 

Mason runs his company efficiently. Every sale is on a “carefully contrived schedule” – before one auction ends another has already started, and there is “constant site updating,” keeping buyer interest from beginning to very end. Although no official celebrations have been planned to mark the decade, Mason is obviously proud of the work he and his company have done.

 Read the full article on Examiner.com

Announcing Asia Week 2014

Asia Week New York recently announced their dates for their 2014 session, which will be held between March 14-22. Stay tuned for more details regarding our upcoming Asian, Ancient & Ethnographic Works of Art Auction. For more information about Asia Week, please visit their website at www.AsiaWeekNY.com.327

 

Watch John Nye on Antiques Roadshow Tonight!

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John Nye and Lark Mason during Antiques Roadshow

iGavel associate seller John Nye of Nye & Company Auctioneers/Appraisers will make an appearance on tonight’s Antiques Roadshow! The episode will air at 8-9PM (EST) on PBS, featuring live tweets from John Nye during the episode from his Twitter account, @antiqueauctions.

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Nye & Company Website
Like Nye & Company on Facebook
Follow John Nye on Twitter

Lark Mason Interviewed by Marketplace.org

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Lark Mason, president of Lark Mason Associates and iGavel Auctions was interviewed for a Marketplace.org’s tech column. Below is an excerpt from the interview:

Which roadshow is better: Twitter or Antiques?

 

Lark Mason is an appraiser on PBS’s Antiques Roadshow, and he’s a lot like a skeptical investor.  I asked him about this seven-year-old social media company — it has a really cute sky-blue bird on it — how much does he think it might be worth?

 

Well, he says, there are a lot of ways to figure out value, so he’s going to have to ask me some questions. Like, what kind of condition it’s in…

 

It hasn’t made a profit yet, I say.

 

Hmm, he says. That’s kind of a challenge.

 

But it has 230 million users, up 39 percent between 2012 and 2013, and it’s expected to keep growing, I perk up.

He likes that a bit better. There’s a good reason to say it’s got a pretty strong valuation for the moment, he says, but as to long term viability, it’s hard to say.

 

Click here to read and listen to the full interview on Marketplace.org

Images from Antiques Roadshow 2013 Tour

Here are some of the photos that were taken during the Antiques Roadshow 2013 Tour for the show’s 18th season, which will air on PBS in January, 2014.

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Lark Mason (middle) with iGavel associate sellers Matthew Quinn (left) of Quinn’s Auction Galleries and Brian Witherell (right) of Witherell’s Art & Antiques, taken in Kansas City

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Lark Mason with wife Erica and daughter Melissa, along with associate sellers Matthew Quinn and Brian Witherell at Kansas City

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Lark Mason with three other appraisers that graduated from University of Tennessee, Floyd Jones (left), Reid Dunavant (right), and Linda Davidson, Associate VP for Development and Alumni Affairs (middle), taken at Knoxville, Tennessee

 

 

Lark Mason to speak at Nelson-Atkins Museum and appraise at Antiques Roadshow in Kansas City this Saturday

Kansas City newspaper Kansas City Star recently interviewed Lark Mason on his upcoming visit to Nelson-Atkins Museum and filming of Antiques Roadshow this upcoming weekend. Read the interview below:

 

 

Cj2XK.St.81Lark Mason, a widely published art and antiques expert, will be in Kansas City on Saturday for a taping of PBS’ “Antiques Roadshow” at Bartle Hall.

Mason, the senior vice president for Chinese art at Sotheby’s from 1985 to 2003, is a specialist in Chinese furniture, and while he’s in town, he will speak on “An Insider’s View of Classical Chinese Furniture” at 7 p.m. Friday in the Chinese Furniture Gallery (202) at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. Admission is free, but tickets are required. Call 816-751-1278 to reserve tickets.

 

Tell me about what you’ll be doing with “Antiques Roadshow” in Kansas City.

 

I am one of the appraisers to appear on air with a large number of other specialists. My area of expertise is Chinese art. We’ll be at the convention center, and we’ll have a lot of people coming to see us, including supporters of PBS and members of the general public bringing objects. They were selected by lottery through WGBH in Boston.

 

And you’ll also be speaking at the Nelson?

 

My top area is Chinese furniture. The Nelson has one of the finest collections in the world. Colin Mackenzie, the museum’s curator of Chinese art, is a good friend, and he’s invited me to do a gallery walk to look at the Chinese furniture collection.

Laurence Sickman, who put together the Nelson’s Chinese collection, was a good friend of my mentor, Wang Shixiang. I translated his book, “Connoisseurship of Chinese Furniture,” in Beijing. So I also have a wonderful connection to the Nelson because of his direct association with Sickman. Wang helped him choose things for the collection.

 

And it’s turned out to be one of the Nelson’s greatest assets.

 

It’s fantastic because of the passion of Laurence Sickman and the support of the board, which gave him free rein to be in China and make selections of things that, at the time, were considered minor works of art. But the result of that freedom and farsightedness is that the Nelson has one of the finest collections, not just in the U.S., but in the world.

It all comes down to the enthusiasm of a particular person pushing his vision and a confluence of opportunity, knowledge and the willingness to commit the resources at a time when there weren’t a lot of resources.

 

What are some of your favorite objects in the Nelson’s collection?

 

One is an alcove bed, which is very famous. The form itself is unusual. It’s a bed with an entry area at the forefront, almost a bed within a small self-contained room. It was made for a wealthy person, with a personal assistant or servants who would help him get dressed. If you use your imagination, you can see the curtains that would have enclosed the sleeping chamber part of the bed, and the outer area where the servant would wait to be received. It’s quite marvelous.

 

The construction and design of it is absolutely fantastic. It’s a Rubik’s Cube of furniture joinery. All these different types of furniture joinery arranged in a repeating pattern have to be put together in a specific order, otherwise it doesn’t work.

 

What other pieces will you highlight?

 

There are a pair of cabinets — what we call “sloping style cupboards” — that are made of huanghuali, a particular kind of Asian rosewood. It’s a beautiful wood of the highest quality used during the Ming and Qing dynasties. What’s extraordinary about these cabinets is the simplicity of the design and the use of the beautifully dramatic grain of the wood as part of the design.

 

The cabinetmaker purposely chose specific cuts of wood to enhance the overall form, mixing man’s creativity with nature. That’s what Chinese cabinetmakers excelled at.

 

Can you cite a couple of memorable finds from your gig on “Antiques Roadshow”?

 

One of the most amazing occurred in Albuquerque about 10 years ago. Albuquerque was not one of those places I expected to see a lot of Chinese art or Asian art in general, but in the middle part of the day, a lady came in with a large group of towels wrapped around an object. She brought it in on a little wagon and wheeled it up to my table. I looked and it was an eighth-century carved marble lion made during the Tang dynasty.

 

It was such a shock to see something that would have been perfectly at home at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, sitting in a Western Flyer wagon wrapped in beach towels. She had inherited it from her family and had been using it as a doorstop.

 

I don’t remember exactly what I valued it at — around $300,000. It was the most valuable item we saw that day.

 

So that kind of find is fairly unusual?

 

None of us knows what’s going to be coming in the door. A tremendous number of people, who receive tickets by lottery, come in and try to find out something about an object they’ve had.

 

A fairly common occurrence is when someone’s parents pass away and leave an object to a child and the child wonders, “Why did my parents leave this to me? What is important about this object?” By figuring out where it was made, why it was made, where it was sold, we can often come up with an answer. That answer may be: “It was made in 1915 and was probably a wedding gift, and they wanted to be sure you had it.”

 

It often has nothing to do with the monetary value. It’s more about the emotional content invested in the object. A lot of what all of us (at “Antiques Roadshow”) do falls into that category. I guess you could say we’re therapists.

I have a copy of a list you put out of “Top 10 Collecting Trends for Summer 2013.” One of the things you point out is how the values placed on objects change with the generations.

 

I think we’ve had a very significant generational shift in the last hundred years. A century ago, one of the important goals was to have an enormous house filled with objects from a variety of cultures that would be evidence of one’s sophistication and worldliness. In the past it was very overt. The furniture was deeply carved and dark and clearly tied to an early period of time in England or France, or even the U.S.

 

Today that kind of overt connection is not necessary. The younger generation is looking for objects that show a sense of design that reflects the period of time in which we live and an international design sense, that emphasizes comfort and subtly messages sophistication.

 

Tell me about iGavel Auctions.

 

It’s an auction platform used by independent auction companies with guarantees for authenticity and condition. It’s a vetted marketplace. I’m the owner, and we have a team of people that oversees it, and I have representatives all over the U.S. who work through our company, including some individuals in Kansas City.

 

It’s a great source for art and antiques and design. We have a sale on iGavel daily; I also have a company, Lark/Mason Associates, and offer online auctions of Asian art twice yearly in October and April. My company is on iGavel with other companies.

 

Read more here: http://www.kansascity.com/2013/08/02/4378388/qa-lark-mason-antiques-roadshow.html#storylink=cpy

Antiques Roadshow and Lark Mason to stop in Baton Rouge this weekend

LSU newspaper The Daily Reveille featured Lark Mason for their story on Antiques Roadshow, which is taking place in Baton Rouge this weekend.

Lark Mason during Antiques Roadshow in 2011

Lark Mason during Antiques Roadshow in 2011

The hit PBS series “Antiques Roadshow” will be making a stop at the Baton Rouge River Center this weekend.

 

The show, which premiered in 1997, has received ten Emmy awards and is the highest-rated show on PBS.

 

The hour-long program takes viewers to various cities across the country as thousands of people bring antiques and collectibles to be appraised. However, only a select few are chosen to actually showcase their items on television.

 

The appraisers in attendance are experts from the country’s leading auction houses who offer free appraisals and share the fascinating history of the items that are brought in for examining.

 

One of the most notable appraisals in the show’s history includes a set of Chinese cups that dated back to the 18th century, which were estimated to be worth up to $1.5 million at the show’s Tulsa, Okla., stop in 2011.

 

On Saturday, “Antiques Roadshow” will be making its debut appearance in Baton Rouge, but it isn’t a stranger to the state of Louisiana. In 2002, the show paid a visit to New Orleans.

 

“We are in the big leagues now with this show,” Baton Rouge Mayor-President Kip Holden said in a news release. “I don’t think you can put a price tag on it because of the people it will reach.”

 

Thousands will flock to the Baton Rouge River Center with hopes that their family heirlooms and pieces of history will be worth thousands  — and maybe millions — of dollars.

A religious document that Baton Rouge resident Diamond Ryan will be bringing to the show dates back to 1796.

 

“I refer to it as a ‘framed scroll.’ There is a statement in Italian which certifies that it is authentic,” Ryan said. “It goes on to say this item is being sent from South America to North America. All that remain are a few spindles of black cloth fibers which are stated to be from the Virgin Mary from the House of Loreto — a biblical Holy place.”

 

Ryan added that she has received much interest in regard to the document over the years, including an inquiry by the Smithsonian Institution.

 

Baton Rouge is one of eight cities that will be featured on the 18th season of “Antiques Roadshow,” which will premiere in January 2014.

 

Click here to read the story on The Daily Reveille

Lark Mason Interviewed by ArtNet

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Q&A with Antique Expert: Lark Mason

BY HELEN BU

From Artnet.com’s Art Market Trends Column.

Lark Mason is an expert in the field of auction and antiques. He is the author of Asian Art: Including the Arts of Islam, an acclaimed art history guide, and translator of two groundbreaking works on Chinese furniture. Mason spent 17 years as an Asian Art appraiser on Antiques Roadshow, and worked for 24 years at Sotheby’s New York, where he served as a generalist, senior vice president in the Chinese works of art department, and director of online auctions. In 2003, he started his own business, an international Fine Art and antiques auction site called iGavel.com.

Helen Bu: On you profile for the PBS series, Antiques Roadshow, I read that you started out in the antique business at an early age. What fascinates you about this industry?

Lark Mason: I became interested in antiques at an early age because of the association of objects with history; not in a dry sense, such as in a book of dates and events, but in a real, physical, tangible sense. The idea of an object, created a generation or more before I was born, having value to someone, intrigued me. I wondered why someone went to the trouble to create an object in the first place, how that object was used, and then why it survived. It fascinated me that objects without a practical use have value. I discovered that objects tie the living to generations that are past, and in the process tell us something about them and about us. Objects also are repositories of skills that have changed and in some instances disappeared. Understanding these processes led to an appreciation for ingenuity and craftsmanship that became the basis for learning the difference between objects made at different time periods and locations.

HB: You are most renowned as an expert in Asian Art and antiques, especially Chinese Art. Was that always your main focus? What brings you into this field?

LM: My interest originally was not with Asian or Chinese Art but with swords, militaria, and early books. During college, my interests changed as I opened an antique shop selling American country and English 18th-century furniture and decorations. I realized after my first year that I needed more experience, which led me to spend a year at Sotheby’s Works of Art Program in London from 1978 to 1979. It was there that I first was exposed to Chinese Art. I remember my first encounter with Chinese Art in the British Museum; I was amazed at the quality and perfection of porcelain created during the early Ming dynasty. Later, I was close to overwhelmed at the Perceval David Collection in London. The ceramic shapes and colors created by the Song potters were as new and fresh today as when they were created over 800 years earlier. After six years as a generalist appraiser for Sotheby’s in New York, working with all types of arts and antiques, I finally landed in the Chinese department, where I stayed until 2003.

HB: I know that you’ve had the opportunity to work with Wang Shixiang(Chinese, 1914–2009), who is reputed as a Chinese culture master, in translating his book, Connoisseurship of Chinese Furniture, back to the 1980s in Beijing. How was that experience? What were your impressions of Wang and Beijing at that time?

LM: Beijing in the late 1980s had more in common with the pre-World War II period than today. It was a time capsule. The building boom had yet to start, and Beijing was still a city with neighborhoods full of Ming and Qing buildings. Every day, I tried to bicycle through different parts of the city. I arrived at Shixiang’s courtyard house around 9 a.m. and we sat across from each other working on a dark, polished zitan painting table. To one side was an open window looking out on the courtyard with a variety of ragged plants and a banana palm, and the other was framed by stacks of books and his collection of crickets. We worked across from each other for six months. Each day around noon, I went back to my dormitory and retyped my notes and had lunch, and then I would ride my bicycle back by 3 p.m. We would work for another three hours, and then he and his wife would often share dinner with me. He was a fantastic cook and delighted in sharing recipes that had been favorites of the court. Seas of commuters filled the streets each morning and afternoon, but then the streets were completely empty by 8 p.m. There were no cars except those near the few western hotels. I remember the first time I heard flocks of pigeons flying overhead with pigeon whistles attached to their bodies. It was an amazing sound. That world is gone and I was privileged to experience it.

Lark Mason and Wang Shixiang

Lark Mason and Wang Shixiang

HB: In 2003, you left Sotheby’s and started your own business, iGavelauctions.com. Why is it solely online? What differentiates it from other online platforms? What are your thoughts about the future for an online art marketplace?

LM: I actually have two businesses. iGavel is an auction platform that is used by independent auction houses whose sales are hosted on the iGavel site. In addition, I own Lark Mason Associates, an auction house that uses the iGavel platform. Lark Mason Associates regularly sells on iGavel and focuses on Asian Art. The difference between iGavel and other platforms is that all of our bidding is online, allowing us to implement policies that most auctioneers cannot. We publish the reserves so that everyone knows the minimum amount, we offer a two-week bidding window, we offer a consistent experience for all users of our site, and we provide plenty of information to make a decision, including guaranteed condition reports and lots of photographs. We also have live exhibitions so that people who wish to view items in person are able to do so. Auction houses with a combination of live bidding and an Internet component leave the online bidder at a disadvantage to the bidder in the salesroom. Our service keeps all bidders at the same level, and, as a result, we end up with a higher percentage of retail-type buyers participating in our sales than is the case with other auction houses.

Click here to continue reading on Artnet.com

TEXTURES OF CHINESE ART: CHINESE ENAMEL DECORATED PORCELAIN PEACH VASE 18TH CENTURY

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This rare porcelain vase is painted in underglaze blue with a peach tree growing out of rockery. The peaches appearing on the shoulder and growing on the tree are painted in peachbloom, which presents a very unusual effect in combination with the underglaze blue. This vase was part of the Yamanaka and Comapny Collection of Chinese and Other far Eastern Art Auction in 1943.
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Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

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Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

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Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

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Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

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Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

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Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

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 Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century


Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

DownloadImages

 Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century


Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

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Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

DownloadImages

Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

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Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

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Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

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Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

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Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

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Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

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Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

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Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

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Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

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Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

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Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

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Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

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Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

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Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

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Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

Chinese Enamel Decorated Porcelain Peach Vase, 18th Century

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A3BC

Online Auction:
April 17th – May 1st, 2013

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Chinese Rhinoceros Horn Lotus Decorated Cup, 17th Century

Chinese_Rhinoceros_Horn_Lotus_Decorated_Cup_17th_Century_19081_A

iGavel is proud to feature a Chinese Rhinoceros Horn Lotus Decorated Cup, 17th Century from a descendant of GE “Chinese” Morrison.

George Ernest Morrison, born on 4 February 1862, was an Australian adventurer who is known for his activities in Asia and the Pacific. Before the age of 21, he traveled to the South Sea Islands and wrote an expose of the evils of the “Kanaka” trade, a trade in “indentured” labor for the Queensland sugar plantations that included kidnapping. His article was published by ‘The Age’ and influenced the eventual suppression of the trade. After several years working in New Guinea and other Asian countries as a journalist, in 1897 he moved to Peking and became the first permanent correspondent there for the London ‘Times’. While there he reported on the tensions between China and Russia and later on he experienced and reported on the Boxer Rebellion. Morrison not only wrote about the Boxer Rebellion, but he also took up arms and joined in defense of the foreign legations that were under siege. Several years later, he was still in China when the 1911 revolution erupted. At that time Morrison took up arms with the revolutionaries and helped fight to establish the Republic of China in 1912. Directly after the Republic was established, Morrison resigned from the ‘Times’ and took a position as an advisor to the Chinese government. He spent the remainder of his career as a representative of the Chinese government. He passed away on 30 May 1920.

Although he did not speak Chinese, Morrison was an avid collector of Chinese art and antiques, most notably books.  The contents of Morrison’s remarkable library, which contained the largest number of books on China ever collected, was sold in 1917, but the building itself was a virtual landmark for nearly a century on Bejing’s Wangfujing road until its destruction in 2007.

Below is a gallery of photos of the rhinoceros horn cup, which is a part of iGavel’s Asian, Ancient and Ethnographic Works of Art Auction. It will also be on view during our exhibition on April 22nd – April 26th.

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Chinese Rhinoceros Horn Lotus Decorated Cup, 17th Century

[AFG_gallery id=’18’]

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GALLERY EXHIBITION
April 22nd – April 26th, 2013
227 East 120th Street, New York City
10:00 – 5:00 pm
212 – 289 – 5588

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Chinese Dark Green Jade Seal with Imperial Bilingual Inscription, 20th century

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Chinese Dark Green Jade Seal with Imperial Bilingual Inscription 20th century

Chinese Dark Green Jade Seal with Imperial Bilingual Inscription 20th century

Chinese Dark Green Jade Seal with Imperial Bilingual Inscription 20th century

Chinese Dark Green Jade Seal with Imperial Bilingual Inscription 20th century

Chinese Dark Green Jade Seal with Imperial Bilingual Inscription 20th century

Chinese Dark Green Jade Seal with Imperial Bilingual Inscription 20th century

Chinese Dark Green Jade Seal with Imperial Bilingual Inscription 20th century

Chinese Dark Green Jade Seal with Imperial Bilingual Inscription 20th century

Chinese Dark Green Jade Seal with Imperial Bilingual Inscription 20th century

Chinese Dark Green Jade Seal with Imperial Bilingual Inscription 20th century

Chinese Dark Green Jade Seal with Imperial Bilingual Inscription 20th century

Chinese Dark Green Jade Seal with Imperial Bilingual Inscription 20th century

Chinese Dark Green Jade Seal with Imperial Bilingual Inscription 20th century

Chinese Dark Green Jade Seal with Imperial Bilingual Inscription 20th century

Chinese Dark Green Jade Seal with Imperial Bilingual Inscription 20th century

Chinese Dark Green Jade Seal with Imperial Bilingual Inscription 20th century

Chinese Dark Green Jade Seal with Imperial Bilingual Inscription 20th century

Chinese Dark Green Jade Seal with Imperial Bilingual Inscription 20th century

Chinese Dark Green Jade Seal with Imperial Bilingual Inscription 20th century

Chinese Dark Green Jade Seal with Imperial Bilingual Inscription 20th century

Chinese Dark Green Jade Seal with Imperial Bilingual Inscription 20th century

Chinese Dark Green Jade Seal with Imperial Bilingual Inscription 20th century

Chinese Dark Green Jade Seal with Imperial Bilingual Inscription 20th century

Chinese Dark Green Jade Seal with Imperial Bilingual Inscription 20th century

Chinese Dark Green Jade Seal with Imperial Bilingual Inscription 20th century

Chinese Dark Green Jade Seal with Imperial Bilingual Inscription 20th century

Chinese Dark Green Jade Seal with Imperial Bilingual Inscription 20th century

Chinese Dark Green Jade Seal with Imperial Bilingual Inscription 20th century

Chinese Dark Green Jade Seal with Imperial Bilingual Inscription 20th century

Chinese Dark Green Jade Seal with Imperial Bilingual Inscription 20th century

Chinese-Dark-Green-Jade-Seal-with-Imperial-Bilingual-Inscription,-20th-Century-ImperialJadeSeal(1)

Online Auction:
April 17th – May 1st, 2013

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GALLERY EXHIBITION
April 22nd – April 26th, 2013
227 East 120th Street, New York City
10:00 – 5:00 pm
212 – 289 – 5588

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iGavel Welcomes Abington Auction Gallery

Abington_Main

iGavel is proud to announce our newest associate seller, Abington Auction Gallery! Their inaugural sale is currently live on iGavel through April 9, 2013, and features a special selection of artwork, jewelry, glassware, fascinating treasures, and unique pieces from notable South Florida Estates. Highlights include a vintage pocket watch, silver from George Smith III, designer handbags and fine jewelry.

Click Here to view Abington Auction Gallery’s March Sale.

Abington Auction Gallery, a privately owned business located in the heart of Fort Lauderdale, handles Auctions, Appraisals, and complete Estate Liquidations. Abington obtains consignments from around the Southeast United States.  Our specialists are well versed in all fields and are able to appraise and market individual pieces to entire collections and estates. We conduct several auctions each year and serve an international audience. Abington Auction Gallery offers customers easy access to our sales worldwide through iGavelAuctions.com.

Click Here to View More Company Information

Lark Mason Predicts Top 10 Collecting Trends for 2013

Lark Mason

No one is in a more respected position than Lark Mason to forecast the direction of new collecting trends, up or down. Thanks to his stellar position as an expert, appraiser, author, and television personality on the PBS series, The Antiques Roadshow, Mason, founder of iGavel Auctions, the online international network of regional auction salesrooms, anticipates trends far in advance of just anybody else. Here are his in-the-know predictions for What’s Hot and What’s Not for 2013:

 

 

Chinese Porcelain, Tongzhi Period

1. Don’t Break The China

The Chinese economy is tied to the West which in today’s world is not a good thing, but China is also benefiting from a rapidly growing group of consumers of which a portion want to own something from their past. The sheer numbers of buyers in China is staggering and the quantity of material limited – a classic supply and demand equation that will be with us for many more years. The Chinese are becoming ever more selective and discerning and the frothiness of the market ought to become a bit more subdued and rational with a focus on the universal criteria of collectors: quality and rarity.

 

 

2. Meet George Jetson

Lounge Chair and Ottoman, Eames for Herman Miller, Mid 20th C.

The hottest area in the decorative arts continues to be mid-century  furniture and odds and ends. Those spikey doos and winged jackets push all the nostalgic buttons for young families putting together a new home. The material is attractive, functional, and the look is being supported by major designers with newly made objects and is relatively inexpensive, still in pre-inflation Jetson dollars. It is also rebellious enough to satisfy the need to be different from the parents. Blurring the lines between old and new, formerly stuffy shops now regularly mix and match modern and earlier material for a fresh, livable environment. In any successful market there is a range of material for both the “starter home” set and those who have settled down and have more to spend and in this market, there is no shortage of supply. Great quality works abound that were created in this most recently past century in every category, from furniture to glass. Get on your scooter and go shopping.

Chinese Contemporary Watercolor, 1979, ‘Coastal Mountains at Dusk or Dawn’

3. Contemporary and Modern Paintings are the One Percent

This market is international. The one tenth of the one percenters want the best and will pay to get it to fill all those empty walls of all those houses. This market will remain vibrant regardless of downturns in Greece or elsewhere.

Ladies Platinum & Diamond Ring

4. Jewels and Precious Metals Both Shine

Even in a nasty economy people want things that are pretty and what is better than jewelry, gold, silver, and platinum? And, buying such for yourself or your favorite other has the added advantage of keeping the pragmatic side of a relationship secure and happy knowing that should everything go bust, you can always hock the jewels.

 

 

5. Watches Keep Ticking

Men’s Rolex Oyster Chronograph Antimagnetic Wrist Watch

Watches appeal to men who otherwise would have nothing to do with the art market. Watches make sense to guys. The engineering, appearance, materials all have value and communicate status to other members of their particular tribe. And in addition to all these great features, watches are the ultimate ego boost for men who insist that everything pass the practicality test. After all, if nothing else, men are practical or at least believe themselves to be. In times of economic uncertainty, when stocks, bonds, and everything else has taken a lickin, watches keep on tickin.

 

6. Keep pouring the wine

Except for Mitt Romney, everyone enjoys wine. We drink it while enjoying great food and good company, and associate it with sophistication and connoisseurship. It is also easy to categorize, with labels identifying where and when it was made. For women, it is a staple of romantic evenings and men love the technical data and gadgets and in tough times it perks us up. After all, who doesn’t like to show off in front of friends (or others) by knowing the latest tid-bit from Mr Parker? For collectors, 2013 will be a good vintage.

7. Old Growth Forests are Still Growing

Important Pair of Federal Mahogany Lolling Chairs, Boston, circa 1775-1790

Some of the best value out
there are the wonderful old growth woods and other materials used by our forebears to create furniture and other objects prior to the 20th century. The best pieces are catching the attention of buyers, whether made in the USA or elsewhere. The gradual fall-off of interest in these objects over the past fifteen years had more to do with a natural recycling of taste than a rejection of quality. Prices rose, buyers dropped out, new areas were discovered, and the cycle goes round and round again. Traditional “antiques” – a word most in the trade wants to avoid – are holding their own and being recognized by the astute as a good value.

 

8. Quality and Condition are More Important Than Ever

In categories that are soft or retrenching, only those pieces in tip-top shape and the best quality will be in demand. Even the slowest markets have bright areas and in those, buyers will always be more interested in pieces that are the best over those that are not.

9. No Place for Lockets and Lace

Think of grandma’s living room. In this case, a “boomer’s” living room filled with priceless stuff handed down that no one else wants. Odds and ends jammed into cabinets, spread across table tops, and filling drawers are about as out as out can be. No one has enough time or energy to fool with this material.

10. Function Trumps Form

The number of collectors of out of date and useless gizmos from the past is burdened by the cries of their partners to “stop dragging that stuff home!” But, in tough economic times when it costs more to lug it around than it costs to purchase it, fewer and fewer people are going to be looking for that rusted gearbox. Same with furniture. It has to make sense and have a use. Potty stools are not going to be setting the market afire even if owned by Louis XV.

Wendell Garrett | 1929-2012

Wendell Garrett with Morrison Heckscher

IGavel Auctions mourns the loss of its good friend, the great Americana scholar Wendell Garrett, who passed away November 14, 2012. He will be missed by all who knew him in the auction world, on the Antiques Roadshow, and in the academic arena of American history.

Wendell lived a very full life, receiving many awards, and was notable for important scholarship in the field of Americana. For more information about Wendell, please visit antiquesandthearts.com, The Antiques Roadshow, and the Magazine Antiques.

Photo Credits from The Magazine Antiques and afanews.com